Prof. Peter Ng recognized as the “Most Prolific Freshwater Decapod Taxonomist to Date” at the 21st International Senckenberg Conference 2010

At the 21st International Senckenberg Conference 2010 held in Frankfurt on 8-10 December 2010, Dr. Sammy De Grave presented his findings on “Global trends in the description of freshwater Decapoda, 1758-2010”. His analysis led him to discover who have described the most number of freshwater decapod taxa from 1758 to 2010. This honour of being the world’s most prolific freshwater decapod taxonomist to date goes to the Director of the Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, Prof. Peter Ng! He is the undisputed leader amongst the top ten persons who have described the most number of freshwater decapod taxa and he topped the chart by describing 262 taxa to date. In order to commemorate this occasion, Drs. Sammy De Grave and Darren Yeo came up with the idea to present Prof. Peter Ng with a special certificate (designed by Kate Pocklington) at the conference. Congratulations to the Director for this incredible achievement!

Top ten freshwater decapod taxonomist and number of taxa that each had described

Rank Author Number of Descriptions
1 Peter Ng 262
2 Dai Aiyun 189
3 Horton Hobbs 188
4 Mary Rathbun 120
5 Cai Yixiong 98
6 Phaibul Naiyanetr 93
7 Liang Xiangqiu 90
8 Gilberto Rodríguez 81
9 Lipke Holthuis 71
10 Richard Bott 70


Certificate presented to Prof. Peter Ng for being the most prolific freshwater decapod taxonomist for the period spanning 1758 to 2010.


Prof. Peter Ng in action to maintain his lead in being the most prolific freshwater decapod taxonomist in the World.

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